FDB APOB has unusually high prevalence in Northern and Central Europe

Although attempts at deducing the genetic history of FDB are limited by uncertainties in reconstructing population movements in the prehistoric past, it has been suggested that it originated in a person thought to be a Celtic (Helvetii) ancestor whose home was originally situated between the rivers Rhine and Maine and whose descendants migrated into the northwest of modern Switzerland more than 2,000 years before the present. It is also suggested that the low prevalence of FDB in Mediterranean peoples and its absence in Turkey is due to the migration barriers created by the Alps and the Pyrenees, hence its relative confinement to the region northwards of central Europe. Although rarely occurring in Italy, Sicily and the general Spanish population, FDB Arg3527Gln is a common cause of ADH in Galicia, a region in northwestern Spain that was settled by Celtic people in the eleventh century BC. It accounts for a significant proportion of those with a clinical diagnosis of FH or autosomal hypercholesterolemia in other nations including Switzerland, Bulgaria, Hungary and Denmark, and is as high as 11% in the Czech Republic and Poland118,119. ~ “Familial hypercholesterolemia: epidemiology, Neolithic origins and modern geographic distribution,” Khemanganee, et al.

Citations 118 and 119 in the above passage are presented below:

118. Bednarska-Makaruk M, Bisko M, Pulawska MF, Hoffman- Zacharska D, Rodo M, Roszczynko M, Solik-Tomassi A, Broda G, Polakowska M, Pytlak A, Wehr H. Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 in a group of hypercholesterolaemic patients in Poland. Identification of a new mutation Thr3492Ile in the apolipoprotein B gene. Eur J Hum Genet 2001;9:836–842.

119. Gasparovic J, Basistova Z, Fabryova L, Wsolova L, Vohnout B, Raslova K. Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 in Slovakia: are differences in prevalence of familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 explained by ethnicity? Atherosclerosis 2007;194:e95–107.

~ “Familial hypercholesterolemia: epidemiology, Neolithic origins and modern geographic distribution,” Khemanganee, et al.