Reconciliation of the Danish and Regeneron FH Reports

Lowering diagnostic standards increases drug sales
Lower accuracy = Higher profit

Central Issue: Published scientific reports are regarded by the industry and regulators as authoritative.  The publication strategy has influenced how Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) is defined and counted, and thus how patients are selected for risky drug sales.

Misinformation is an agent for disease

As far as money can bully the door to the laboratory it will be academic corruption and not contagion itself that spreads ill-health on a vast scale.

“Higher Prevalence” is the key to Marketing Drugs

“Higher than Expected Prevalence” is a marketing tool: Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman, who was expert witness in the Wyeth trial, helped expose widespread abuse in medical literature. She was quoted in a magazine article titled, “Ghostwriters in the medical literature.”  

“People tend to think of marketing messages as ‘buy drug A,’ but that’s never the message imbedded in such articles. …. The message may be, disease A is underdiagnosed or far more serious than previously believed ….”[1]

Being able to claim “higher prevalence than previously thought” is the ability to claim underdiagnosis.  Underdiagnosis leads to the conclusion of undertreatment and undertreatment means that doctors aren’t working hard enough. Higher Prevalence is the cornerstone and once it is set, the rest of the argument falls into place. 

Pharma’s[2] “methodology” achieves this end and that methodology is …

  • The linguistic conflation of distinct diseases into one name: “FH.”
  • Selecting geographical regions known to have higher than average prevalence.
  • Lowering standards to harvest errors.
  • Mathematical shenanigans.
  • Swapping unprofitable patients out and profitable false positives in.

[1] “Ghostwriters in the medical literature,” Susan Gaidos, http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2010/11/ghostwriters-medical-literature  

[2] Science, Dec. 2016, Dewey et al. and Abul-Husn et al. 10.1126/science.aaf6814, p. 10.1126/science.aaf7000

Matt Berry

  • Website: FHprevalence.com
  • Website: 3footcrowbar.com
  • Twitter: @3footcrowbar